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Adrienne Veronese

Poet, Novelist, Author, Essayist, Humorist

Adrienne grew up in the Pacific Northwest and attended the University of Oregon and Antioch University West in Seattle.

Her early influences include humorists James Thurber, Edward Gorey and Erma Bombeck, and later Tom Robbins, Philip Roth, Chuck Palahniuk, and Carl Hiaasen. Both Thoreau and Whitman served as guides who led her to Toni Morrison and Lilian Hellman. And the poetry of Lew Welch and Gary Snyder, Philip Whalen, Weldon Kees, Anne Sexton, and Maya Angelou helped foster the spirit behind the incident in Boston in which she tossed a glass of beer in Gregory Corso's face. It is entirely possible some of that spirit was also fostered at a young age by the writers and poets who sat around her mother's kitchen table, as well as an astonishing number of anomalous events she affectionately attributes to her "invisible friends" for lack of any better explanation.

She worked with Boston's Stone Soup Poets, wrote the Birch Bark Poems at the Quarry Hill Creative Center in Vermont, which led to her running the graduate poetry workshop as a freshman for University of Oregon's poet in residence, John Haislip. She was among three featured poets chosen out of 3,000 to represent the Pacific Northwest in the annual commencement reading at Seattle's Bumbershoot Festival in 1979. Prior to that only internationally renowned poets were hired for the position. She has read with the Laguna, Santa Monica, Santa Barbara, Venice and Long Beach poets. Her work has been published in both print literary journals including Stone Soup Press, Connections, Emotions, the Bellingham Review, and electronic formats including Nostrovia! Press FALD Poetry and  Plum Tree Tavern. She looks forward to the upcoming launch of her sci-fi comedy, The Good, The Bad & The Secret Squirrel this December, and a foray into online episodic fiction.

                           

Adrienne currently lives and writes on Northern California's Redwood Coast.

                                                                   

 

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